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Faster, stronger, longer. For a longer health span. It’s well-established that exercise can significantly reduce the risk of major diseases, including cancer, cardiovascular disease, and dementia. Also, being fitter and more physically healthy leads to improved mental health. I’m 66 years old, and while I was an average athlete at best as a young man, I’m now at the high end of performance and key health metrics for my age group. The message is clear to me. Working hard, being faster and stronger, and training for longer durations works. Especially when attention is paid to nutrition and other lifestyle factors. See here a summary of the benefits of exercise and, conversely, the risks of frailty, disease and mental illnesses when more sedentary lifestyles are enacted.

Follow my blog and social feeds, where you will see the type of exercise and nutritional strategies I use. I’ve been fortunate to have been involved in sports, sports nutrition, and functional foods for thirty years. As a result, I have a good idea of what works and what is BS. I will support the former with scientific evidence and call out the latter.

Please remember that the challenges I set myself are truly challenging for me. I only complete some of them. If I were to hit every target, then I would not be setting the bar high enough. Injury can stop me, or life can get in the way. But I will give them my best shot and document the good, the bad, and the ugly.

Latest Posts
March 31, 2024You Can’t Improve It If you don’t measure it, you can’t improve it. The diagram on the left illustrates my Training Peaks fitness trend over the last year. A year ago, I was ramping up my fitness for the annual Girona cycling pilgrimage, which was a precursor to Ride London in May. As is documented elsewhere, Ride London saw me in the ICU for 12 days with multiple fractures. The graph bottom right shows my fitness fall precipitously. And then, my climb back. I have cycled, gone to the gym, and even taken up running—all to get back to fitness. And this morning, my fitness was higher than when I came into Ride London 2023. With Girona only three weeks away I had planned some hilly climbs in the month leading into the trip. Three sessions of North London hills. And yesterday, an absolutely brutal loop through the worst the Surrey Hills has to offer. When I finally got home, I was wracked in agony and was experiencing cramps. A long day in the saddle can do that for you. I don’t remember another day when I saw the gradient at 20% and over than yesterday. For a few seconds, I saw a reading of 28%. At 103 kgs, hills of that profile are no fun. Relatively Strong If you don’t measure it applies to other parameters, too. Garmin measures an approximation of VO2. This measure is increasingly seen as a good indicator of longevity – see this range of Peter Attia articles. We can go into a long argument about the accuracy of this Garmin measurement, but it counts for me. Firstly, because I will track a trend over time and if I’m maintaining or improving, that’s a good thing. If I did the fully-scientific VO2 test with a mask and dozens of sensors clipped to me I would probably get a different number. But then I would need to do it again and again and again in order to see progress. What I like about being in Garmin’s top 10% for my age and gender is the massive data pool. With millions of Garmin devices in circulation, my performance stacks up against a large peer group. I have two more areas in my ‘if you don’t measure it’ category: sleep and Heart Rate Variability. We are all aware of the importance of sleep in a wide range of physical and mental health areas. My trend for the last eight weeks is steadily downwards but still within the normal range. One to watch, for sure. The other measure is Heart Rate Variability. This is another critical measure when it comes to establishing base fitness, and it’s a great early warning system; summary here. My HRV is high, although yesterday’s smash fest has left my HRV with an amber signal, which tells me my recovery condition is marginal—a day to take it easy. It’s a good early indicator for colds and other illnesses. Quite often, I have seen my HRV fall in the days leading up to a cold. Summary There is no substitute for the ‘if you don’t measure it’ approach to fitness. Without points of reference, there is no way to understand whether you are genuinely making progress. Feel is a good indicator, but it isn’t definitive. The numbers never lie when looking at trends. I have settled on the three most essential measures available to us weekend warriors who don’t have access to full-blown sports laboratories. This routine fits into my life easily. Training Peaks and Garmin do their stuff in the background, while HRV takes me one minute with a finger sensor and app. However, for Apple and Garmin watches and Whoop wristbands, HRV is measured. I have found the wrist-based devices to be less consistent in measuring over a period, sometimes delivering wild swings for no reason. Golden rule? If you don’t measure it, you can’t improve it. [...]
March 28, 2024What Is Misogi? A traditional Japanese purification ritual centred on waterfall bathing. In the Shinto faith, ‘misogi’ means ‘water cleansing’. Standing under the icy waterfall purifies the soul and prepares one for the next 364 days of the year. In a contemporary context, misogi has extended into a comprehensive personal development and transformation approach. The goal remains purification and renewal, but it is achieved through a broader range of pursuits, including physical and mental challenges and spiritual practices. Mental resilience is a focus; a tough physical challenge challenges the psyche; therefore, techniques such as meditation and reflection help one to tackle significant challenges. In many misogi approaches, nature plays a significant role as its energy and purity can support the cleansing process. I was introduced to it by a friend some weeks ago, and it appealed to me. In his embracing the concept, he schedules an annual physical challenge. He failed last year, and I have understood that this is important. The misogi should challenge to the point there is a 50% probability of achieving the goal. Pushing oneself hard and looking internally for strength and resources is part of the spiritual cleansing. It cannot be in the comfort zone. Learning More The conversation led me to read The Comfort Crisis by Michael Easter. He posits that our modern lifestyle is too comfortable. Driving, living in air-conditioned comfort, and more food than we can ever need all serve to undermine our spiritual and physical richness and resilience. He explores this at length, centring the book on him going into Arctic Alaska for five weeks, hunting to survive, enduring extreme weather, and none of the comforts we deem essential. Five weeks without washing was a footnote, given the scale of the challenges. I approached the book with scepticism, tired of ‘bro science’ and magical diets and exercise routines. This one boils down to one simple idea – to get out of our comfort zone. It prompted me to revisit this blog post on Mind Over Body, and I can see the threads of The Comfort Crisis running through this thinking. My Misogi(s) The notion appealed to me. I like to tackle hard things, not seeking to win but to prove that I can. In recent years, this has made me more resilient and self-aware, more in touch with my inner conversation, and more capable of managing my spiritual and mental health. I have already identified my 2024 misogi, with me entering the New York Marathon—my first-ever marathon and running a sport that I received medical advice to cease more than twenty years ago. Add osteoarthritis in the knees to my advanced years; I believe it’s misogi-worthy. Getting through the training and event will take a lot of mental resilience and introspection. I’m attempting a mental misogi. I have wanted to write a novel for most of my life, even as a teenager, yet I have always found a reason not to. I believe I don’t have the skills to get it done, that I’m not naturally inclined to the artistic, and have the necessary that I don’t have the inner knowledge to write something compelling. Definitely less than a 50% chance of achieving that. I find it almost incomprehensible that I can pull together a novel. So let’s go. I’m giving myself one year to arrive at an advanced draft of a novel. It’s my birthday in May, so to make the finish line easy to remember, let’s say the draft will be completed on 22 May 2025. It may take me two years; who knows? But it’s a big challenge that will test a lot of aspects of me, and that in my book, is a misogi. Putting It Out There This is a short blog, but it is important to me. I don’t want to be someone who casually throws around ideas prefaced with the words, ‘I might’. We all know people like that. Hell, I’ve done it myself. I am responsible if I tell you I will run a marathon and write a novel. There is no walking away from the misogi. Watch this space. And as a final question: what’s your misogi? [...]
March 21, 2024It’s been a while since I posted about my mental health. The general direction is good. I learn more about myself and how to manage myself as the years pass. The last ten months have seen me push a couple of notions aside. My never-ending journey of mental health has been powerfully demonstrated to me. As an aside, the image of me here is me feeling good, having just finished a hard circuit training session. Even though I look a bit grim. As documented elsewhere on my blog, I had a severe cycling accident last May that left me in ICU for 12 days. Positive mental approaches saw me navigate that and make a remarkable recovery. What did that tell me? – mental health and mental strength are two different things. Undoubtedly, even after trying to rise from the tarmac, I was already engaging a part of my brain that made me determined, adopt a positive attitude, and work through some immense pain without doubting myself once. I’ve had anxiety attacks and short bouts of depression since my recovery, but during the crucial weeks and even months after the accident, my mental strength didn’t waver. I stepped back from full-time work five months ago. Over the years, several people speculated whether work-related stress was the source of anxiety and depression and all the baggage that comes with those conditions. I didn’t feel that it was. This was me. The same me that was anxious and depressed as a teenager. In the five months I’ve had to pursue new interests, including helping young businesses and exploring a couple of things I’ve always wanted to try, I’ve still had bouts of depression and particularly anxiety. No more 60-70 hours a week, no more business pressure. But still the same challenges going on inside my brain. Let me quickly say I’m not one of these professional mental health victims who circulate social media. I do not want to garner likes, or want people to feel sorry for me. I regard my mental health as something that’s part of me, my makeup, my personality. Now, I get that it does not add to my appeal, and it has and can make me a complex man to be around. But I’m still here, and I’m not complaining. I can make significant progress for extended periods. But make no mistake, there’s no bartering with mental health. It’s a perverse companion and can take me down a peg or two when I believe I’m on sunnier uplands. But what can one do? Give up, feel sorry for oneself, despair? These are all options. Yet I owe it to myself and my friends and family to wring the most from this life. My Achilles heel is my mental health. Many others carry much more debilitating health conditions or have life struggles that put my health into perspective. Life is not fair, no sir. But I feel blessed for the life I have. My never-ending journey of mental health. Do I have any practical advice? The articulated mindset is powerful; there is always a way to improve one’s mental health. Keep moving forward, and don’t get discouraged, even on dark days. The words sound trite, but we are here for a short time, and we owe to ourselves and those around us to make the most of our one life. If a day feels dark, there will be another day and another. And each day is an opportunity. I have also found that a mindful approach can help. For example, taking a moment to detach yourself from the now to do a mind and body check can be helpful. I’ll realise I was good a couple of days ago; I will check off that I’m doing all the right things and take a snapshot of my current circumstances. That can reveal what is happening for me in the here and now, which are feelings and moods that will likely pass. Mainly if I accept the concept of my never-ending journey of mental health. It’s part of my being; it’s who I am, and I accepted that a long time ago. My second check is to run through my list of support habits. Daily meditation, journalling, regular exercise, sleep routines, and supplements help me. That makes me sound like one of those dreadful LinkedIn types who get up at 3 am for an ice bath and then go through a three-hour spiritual awakening before cracking on and making their next billion. For me, it’s more straightforward. When my brain chemistry is fizzing and banging, anchoring myself with positive habits centres me. I’m still determining which of my habits works, if any, or are placebo; I will leave that to the self-appointed social media gurus. I know they all feel good and provide me with a positive platform for self-care—a gift to myself. I also know that when I take stock, I often realise that I’ve dropped a couple of good habits, so I snap back into the discipline, the focus. The journey continues. I meet a psychiatrist every six to eight weeks. I’m on medication, but I’m feeling optimistic as I’m at the start of a taper. And I see a therapist every four to six weeks. There is no illusion, and I know all three of these professional props could be with me for a long time. But that will not make me stop working on my mental health journey. I won’t feel hopeless, helpless, or defeated. [...]
January 30, 2024No f@£$%^g way am I doing that. Well, guess what, I am. I got the news last Friday that an entry into the 2024 New York Marathon was mine. Thank you to Dan and Sam at Science in Sport. Logically, there is no way I should or can run a marathon, and that’s why it’s such a great challenge. It was 23 or 24 years ago that an orthopaedic consultant told me that I had a bone bruise in my right knee as a result of my running and that it was time to hang my trainers up. I did do that. I didn’t do a lot of exercise for several years following that before finally getting off my ever-larger backside and buying a bike. The rest, as they say, is history. The farthest I have run is 16 miles in a training run, leading up to the consultation with Mr No Fun of Windsor Royal Hospital. Lazarus Rises I will be 67 when the starting gun goes for the marathon. I’m still not Eliud Kipchoge size, at 6′ 5″ and 230 pounds. My knees are worse than when I was not a great runner around the turn of the millennium. I indeed tore a meniscus in my right knee almost three years ago, and the subsequent x-rays told me that I have moderate osteoarthritis in both knees. I make a noise when I get out of a chair. If it’s after exercise, I make an even bigger noise. After brutal bike rides, I have been known to roll out of the chair onto the floor and slowly battle to an upright position. As I said, there is no f@£$%^g way I will run a marathon. Why can I complete 26.2 miles? Rationally, we know knee osteoarthritis is not a reason to stop running. It was twenty years ago, but a lot of medical research has shown running doesn’t worsen the condition, and indeed, in some scenarios, it can improve knee health. So crappy knees are not a good enough excuse. No sir. I believe that my knees would be worse if I didn’t exercise. I know my chances of living a long, healthy life would shorten, and I know my mental health would suffer. I’ll take some pain for the overall benefit of my health. Pick your poison. Do nothing and be gradually subsumed by age and lifestyle-related conditions. Or stay healthy and deal with a localised issue. I will wear out before I rust out. Can I Tough It Out? Mentally, I am better equipped for arduous training and a tough event. In the confusing mid-life sea of my forties, I didn’t feel I was a determined man, certainly not by my current standards. I was on the early slopes of my mental health journey and had not pieced together why I was how I was. I’ve developed a lot of insight since then, and I am most certainly mentally tougher now than at any time in my life. I figured out somewhere on the journey that mental toughness can be developed. My proof point was my cycling accident less than a year ago when I found I had reserves of toughness that surprised me. No f@£$%^g way is a different proposition in my later life. The task will take discipline. I will prioritise running in my overall training and not get overambitious, building up mileage steadily and, critically, getting enough rest. Losing a couple of pounds will help me. I am also ensuring I work hard on mobility and stretching. Nutrition and supplementation will be important. Like many of us, I am not consistent with the elements mentioned earlier. The key to turning no f@£$%^g way into a successful mission is to be consistent—week in and week out. I can do that. New York, New York Why the New York Marathon? I love the city and have lost count of the times I have visited it. I remember an old friend, an OG of ultrarunning, telling me there was no other event like it for atmosphere. He recalls crossing a bridge and becoming aware of an audible buzz in the distance and it becoming louder. By the time he left the bridge for the next city block, he felt it was like being in a packed football stadium. This guy has run Marathon de Sables, amongst other iconic events, and New York stands out in his memories. November last saw me at the event’s finish line, thanks to Science in Sport, a marathon sponsor. I had been recovering from a serious cycling accident and was already wondering what my 2024 challenge should be. Watching people sprint, walk, wobble, puke, and be carried over the finish fired me up. A blind man crossing the line at 3:06 was an inspiration. Watching a hero of mine, cancer survivor Tommy Rivs, finish in 4:41 made me emotional. This felt like an impossible enough challenge to galvanise me. Tommy Rivs, Gently Raging About Tommy. In July 2020, he was admitted to hospital with what was thought to be COVID-19, but it turned out to be a rare and aggressive form of lymphoma. He began chemotherapy and remained in a coma in the intensive care unit for two and a half months. He then went through a bone marrow transplant and spent time in physical rehab, learning how to carry out the simplest of tasks. Seventy-five pounds fell from his already lean frame. But in 2021, he returned to the New York Marathon and finished in 9 hours and 19 minutes, long after the event had closed. Now, Tommy was a world-class athlete before his illness. Nevertheless, I can get around the same course in November 2024 if he can return from that. Steady … Steady is the watchword for me—a steady return to running after a long break. I went out for a few runs of 2.5 to 4 miles in December and January. Immediately, I found my knees to be sore as hell. The reason was I was going too fast. I felt it was really slow, but after conferring with more experienced people, it became clear that slow running is the key at the outset. A maximum and minimum pace in my Garmin watch now keeps me honest. I don’t need to start my marathon training plan until May; therefore, until then, it will be a lot of slow three-mile runs to build a physical base. Weathering my knees and body to get used to the different running mechanics. I joined the Slow AF Running Club to power my No F@£$%^g Way challenge. Everything I read and hear is that, especially given my age, strength training is a must, preferably twice a week. Now my cup is too full, given my cycling. If I try to run to a programme and strength train twice, then there isn’t much left for rest. And bugger all for cycling. That has led me to make a plan for the full year. I’m zoned in on our Chaingang Cyclists Girona trip in mid-April, but that is the big event of the year for me. (He said, conveniently ignoring a summer jaunt to Paris may be on the cards.) I go to Venice for a month straight after Girona, and there I plan to spend a month stacking the three-mile runs. On 1 July, my marathon training plan starts. I’m using a structured Hal Higdon programme for marathon novices. It calls for four weekly runs, although I will see how that goes. If in doubt, I will drop one of the short runs. It’s all about the recovery. It’s not a flashy plan; it’s a proven plan. Simple is good. New Kit What’s a new sport without a new kit? Of course, I bought some. Thankfully, this isn’t a case of bespoke cycling frames and ludicrously priced shoes and bib shorts. I kept it to a new pair of ASICS Gel Kayano shoes I bought in New York. The timing of that purchase should tell you my mind has already been made up. Then, a few people told me to have a gait analysis. Which I did at the excellent Run And Become in London. That saw me walking out with the correct ASICS shoes that support my feet better. It’s worth noting I take a UK size 14, but my feet are very narrow too. I suspect my toes are longer than some people’s feet. The new shoes are comfortable. The more expensive Kayanos now sit on my shoe rack, looking bereft. I bought a Salomon running vest to try the new gadgets from an entrepreneur I am helping. His Mix Innovations business has some neat and patented hydration delivery devices. I will do a full road test once I break through the three-mile barrier. No f@£$%^g way am I buying too much kit. I’ve just lied to myself, in writing, in public. What’s Next? Let me log some training miles, and I will report back. Will my body adapt, or will it say no f@£$%^g way? Let’s find out. All the blogging in the world doesn’t help me now; it’s time to hit the road—a poor man’s David Goggins, raging against the weakness of humans, exorcising it from my body. For you Goggins fans out there, you must catch up with Walker Ward on Instagram, the fat, white Goggins documenting his adventures on the road. “I shat myself in Louisiana” is a classic from him. I also plan to raise money for a charity close to my heart. But more detail of that will come in future months. But most of all, the plan is to challenge myself. Do I have the discipline and mental toughness to get through the training? I know my body will protest; most certainly, my knees will trouble me, and my lower back is another weak area. The strategies include the right training volume, sensible strength training, and a real focus on recovery. And if I can do the training, I will complete the event. I don’t have a target time, as an aside. My goal is to finish, which will be more than good enough. I will walk the course if I have to. There is no f@£$%^g way I will fail to finish. Book that now. [...]
January 8, 2024It’s too early in the year to decide what my 2024 challenges are. I’m spreading my efforts across several disciplines, having thrown in the running for the first time this year. Ideally, I would have a big day on the bike, a half marathon or more, and a 160kg deadlift. But I’m still trying to find the right balance of rest and recovery for all three training types. I will set my 2024 goals at the end of January. [...]
January 7, 2024Faster, stronger, longer for longer. I rebranded my website to focus more clearly on having a longer and healthier life. If you are 50 years old or older, then there is something of interest to you in my blog. Physical exercise, being mindful of mental health, and adopting positive lifestyle practices will all improve your health span. I will not live forever, even if the option were available, I won’t take it. I’ll leave that to the billionaires of Silicon Valley. But I will do everything I can to get the most out of my lifespan. I want to be healthy and then die quickly. I have no ambition to go the way of family members who saw a chronic decline in physical or mental health over many years and even decades. The science is unambiguous – regular cardiovascular and strength training exercise can reduce the risk of many age-related illnesses. Longer. All-cause mortality reduces by 30-35% through consistent, vigorous physical activity. Here is another large-scale study that quantifies how much exercise makes a difference. Elsewhere in the blog, I will add to a list of scientific references to support the thesis. Even at 66, I can become faster and stronger and exercise longer. As well as enjoying challenging myself, the health upside is worth the sweat and discomfort. I hear some of you challenge whether anything can be improved. After all, Father Time cannot be denied. I’m fitter now than I was at the age of 50. But, even if I went along with the challenge, yes, improvements can be made. I measure all my achievements versus the norm for my age, height and weight. Stronger. Faster. The weight goals to reach advanced or elite in a deadlift for my age group are clear. I know I hold my age group’s Regent’s Park cycling lap record. My Vo2 is in the top 10% of my age group. If it can be measured, it can be improved. And even when you are on the slide due to the passage of time, you can always compete with your age group peers and, indeed, yourself. Or you can sit in an armchair and become immobile and obese, with a plethora of lifestyle-related diseases ready to creep up on you. If you want to be faster, stronger, and longer, then bear with me. I’ll relate my journey and hope that somewhere along the journey, there’s a nugget of information or a recognition of a challenge that might help you with your journey. I won’t sugar-coat it; there is no miracle method, and I don’t believe in snake oil. My knees have been burning since a 5k run on Friday. I tore a meniscus during a squat challenge three years ago, and that triggered osteoarthritis in one knee. Then, the same happened to the other knee. I have moderate osteoarthritis in both knees, and sometimes new exercises can make it flare up. In my case, taking up Slow AF Running triggered knee pain. This is where the critics say, “See, exercise is bad for you!” Yet I come from a family where exercise has never been taken in any generation, but several relatives have suffered arthritis. Pain during exercise is not always a reason to stop. I’m not advocating David Goggins-style pain. But, sometimes, the pain of carrying on is less than the years of pain that can come from doing no exercise. Don’t Fall For The BS Please don’t fall for the later-life BS where people talk to you as though you’re fragile and will break if you exercise hard or pick up a deadlift bar. If you want to be fragile, infirm, and prone to falls, then don’t do the exercise. If you insist on being overweight or having type-2 diabetes, then don’t go out and do some cardio work. I decline to be addressed as though I’m in some way disabled by age. I will be the best version of myself by not living like the previous generations chose to do, for voluntary and involuntary reasons. Men lose 3-5% of muscle mass per decade from the age of 30. Over their lifetime, can lose 30% of their peak muscle mass. This is called sarcopenia. It can result in a higher rate of falls and associated injury, and an increase in all-cause mortality. The study here indicates that loss of muscle mass and muscle strength hurt all-cause mortality. The very good news is that muscle strength and mass can be improved in whatever decade you are in. The study here shows significant gains in mass and strength can be made even at 75 years old plus. Do not allow people to turn you into a version of their parents and grandparents. The science is robust, and cardio training or lifting heavy weights benefits your entire health span. Don’t fall for the BS. Be faster, stronger, go longer, for longer. It’s Always Training Day I am going to do a daily update on my training – here. And I will be as honest as I can. Because we all have an exercise philosophy in our head, but it doesn’t always survive contact with the real world. I want to train every day, for example. And often, I can put together an impressive streak of days on the bike and in the gym. But the body invariably says enough. Every time I think I have solved the equation, the body will randomly say no more. Now, I’m wise enough to listen and not push on. To my credit, I don’t give up whenever a cloud comes over the sun. It needs to be a severe signal of fatigue or bodily pain. Today is the latest in my running delusion. In November, I took up running and bought myself some high-end running shoes. I had three runs in December, and I completed three 5k runs in January. An orthopaedic surgeon told me around 25 years ago that my running days were over. Yet, here I am, lacing them up again. My knees hurt, and today, my shins hurt. But they would hurt if I didn’t run. My shins? – not so much. Let’s see how I go. I enjoy running once more, although my fitness and pace are low. But already, I have sneaked looks at the beginner, novice, intermediate, and advanced 5k times for men my age. Purpose, Mental Health, Social Ties To be clear, there are more factors than exercise in the longer health span part of my faster, stronger, longer for longer approach. Paying attention to sleep. Social ties and community. Having an ikigai – a purpose, a reason to be. I touch on these areas when I blog about mental health. I intuitively understand there is a positive and reinforcing cycle between physical health, exercise, and mental health. There is a lot of scientific proof supporting my intuition, for example, here and here. The feel-good we get from exercise is more than just a fleeting feeling, there is a concrete link to your mental health. Indeed, a very tough training session or event also can support positive mental health through the act of setting the bar high and clearing it. The pain is worth it for the gain in the tough sessions. Once More – Faster, Stronger, Longer. For Longer I would like to summarise my philosophy. It’s based on scientific research, which you can find in links and references all over this site. Vigorous cardiovascular exercise and regular heavy gym or home bodyweight work have many health benefits. Fact. Consciously attend to your ikigai, build social and community ties, pay attention to your sleep, and be mindful of your mental health. That, too, will benefit your health span. Fact: Again, with deep scientific support. And I’m talking to you. Man, woman, other. Short, tall, fat, thin. We can all be faster, stronger, go longer, and live longer. It’s a democratic and inclusive mindset, too, in that anyone can adopt these practices. One advantage of enjoying later life is to utilise the wisdom acquired along the way. Attitudes to health and wellness have changed dramatically, even in the last 20 years. Sadly, diseases related to being overweight or sedentary have also increased. But anyone 50 or over should refuse to accept the old, worn-out stereotypes of ageing. Old, handed-down images of people in the third and fourth quarter of life must be discarded. Get out there and be faster, stronger and go for longer. Your health and wellbeing will improve; your family and friends will be grateful; and you will be less of a burden on the healthcare system. [...]
Love to see two of my go-to training platforms come together 🚀🚀🚀

Love to see two of my go-to training platforms come together 🚀🚀🚀

Great to see #tourdelunsar going ahead this year. Sincere thanks to the new sponsor Fundsmith and all returning sponsors. And a huge shoutout to @thecyclingpodcast for promoting the event and helping us secure our crowdfund. 

Good luck to the tireless team @stylishmankarim @roxhargreaves @tomowencc and @lunsarcycling

Great to see #tourdelunsar going ahead this year. Sincere thanks to the new sponsor Fundsmith and all returning sponsors. And a huge shoutout to @thecyclingpodcast for promoting the event and helping us secure our crowdfund.

Good luck to the tireless team @stylishmankarim @roxhargreaves @tomowencc and @lunsarcycling

Bucket list event this June in Essouria #gnawa #gnaoua

Bucket list event this June in Essouria #gnawa #gnaoua

If you can measure it, you can improve it. See 🔗 in bio for my three key trends to track.

My @trainingpeaks fitness level trends. I’m much fitter than I was one year ago, as I start to pick up training for @chaingangcyclistsofficial Girona pilgrimage. If you look at the 365 days, you can see where my @ridelondon accident happens, then fitness hitting rock bottom, then the relentless build over months.

No shortcuts, no excuses. Just getting the work done. Shout out to @cycledoutoflockdown @the_ironempress @dan_lampard who were positive allies every lift, pedal turn, and running step of the way.

You don’t know me son. 

#neverstop #keepgrinding #embracethesuck

If you can measure it, you can improve it. See 🔗 in bio for my three key trends to track.

My @trainingpeaks fitness level trends. I’m much fitter than I was one year ago, as I start to pick up training for @chaingangcyclistsofficial Girona pilgrimage. If you look at the 365 days, you can see where my @ridelondon accident happens, then fitness hitting rock bottom, then the relentless build over months.

No shortcuts, no excuses. Just getting the work done. Shout out to @cycledoutoflockdown @the_ironempress @dan_lampard who were positive allies every lift, pedal turn, and running step of the way.

You don’t know me son.

#neverstop #keepgrinding #embracethesuck

Misogi. See 🔗in bio for my two big personal challenges. One you know about. Another which may surprise you. 
#misogi #neverstop #keepgrinding

Misogi. See 🔗in bio for my two big personal challenges. One you know about. Another which may surprise you.
#misogi #neverstop #keepgrinding

This is why I love my @chaingangcyclistsofficial family - on our Saturday ride we ended up riding past the new Banksy. Turns out two of us were talking to a guy who today’s press claims was Banksy. So one of my clubmates does this tribute with a nod to my @scienceinsport heritage 🤣

This is why I love my @chaingangcyclistsofficial family – on our Saturday ride we ended up riding past the new Banksy. Turns out two of us were talking to a guy who today’s press claims was Banksy. So one of my clubmates does this tribute with a nod to my @scienceinsport heritage 🤣

So good to see @eganbernal return to the World Tour podium with @ineosgrenadiers 🙌🙌🙌

So good to see @eganbernal return to the World Tour podium with @ineosgrenadiers 🙌🙌🙌